Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

Until the cause of the erectile dysfunction has been determined, it is not possible to decide a treatment for the condition. Where a medical or iatrogenic root is found, treatment is often possible and sometimes very simple. In other cases, a combined treatment program may be required; and in extreme cases, surgery and implants are available. PDE5 Inhibitors, of which Viagra is the most famous trade name, were developed in the 1990s, and have changed the erectile dysfunction treatment forever. The drug works by replacing PDE5 (to which it is molecularly very similar) with itself, and aiding the process of stimulation of the penile shaft and consequent relaxation of the arterial muscles in the penis.

There are no known, serious side-effects to using Viagra, and the drug has achieved unparalleled success on the world market. Other uncontroversial treatments include the vacuum pump and compression ring. This piece of equipment allows an erection to be developed temporarily – and maintained during intercourse by the suppression ring – but produces erections which are, by all accounts, less successful than the naturally occurring erection. There is some evidence, however, to suggest that long-term use of the vacuum pump can occasionally improve a man's ability to develop an erection without use of the pump. This is not a consistent effect, however, and many men find the equipment unsatisfactory.

Surgery and the fitting of inflatable or rigid implants are extreme procedures, and very rarely recommended by medical professionals. Although known to be very successful, the surgery is incredibly invasive and carries with it the usual risks of surgical intervention and the implantation of 'foreign bodies'. There are numerous controversial and unproven treatments available for erectile dysfunction, with some currently undergoing rigorous testing and which may be available on the market in the next few years.